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REVIEW: Dial Em For Murder

 

Title: Dial Em For Murder 

Author: Marni Bates

Synopsis: 

Sixteen-year-old Emmy Danvers was just trying to write a halfway decent romance novel when a senile old man mumbled a cryptic warning, tackled her to the ground in the middle of Starbucks, and…died right on top of her.

Unfortunately for Emmy, the incident wasn’t quite as random as she thought, and it turns out that the old man might have taken a bullet for her. Not only that, he slipped something into her pocket: a digital tablet containing secrets that she has no idea how to unlock, but that others are ready to kill for. Thrust into a world where nothing is as it seems, Emmy must try to track down her absentee father, deal with a flirtatious bad boy who may or may not be on her side, and, oh yeah, stay one step ahead of the killers lurking in the shadows of an exclusive prep school. The old man’s parting advice to “trust nobody” doesn’t sound so crazy after all….

 

WARNING: THIS REVIEW MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS.

When I picked up this book, I had very high standards. It seemed cute, and the plot seemed very interesting. It also seemed enticing with the promises of a ‘flirtatious bad boy’. (What can I say? I’m a sucker for those.) And while it was enjoyable and I finished it within the day I started it, it only met some of my hopes.

At some points, the plot was a lot to keep up with. There were a million things to keep up with from page one, but thankfully there was no problem for me. But if you’re like others who prefer a simple one tracked plot, you might want to put the book down. Despite that, the plot was really enjoyable. I didn’t expect the plot twist at the end (any of the plot twists, really) and I was able to relate somewhat to the main character, Emmy. (Yeah, she’s a mess. But so am I. We’re practically twins!) But she wasn’t perfect, especially with her hyper-focusing on finding her father. Like, Hellooo? Someone’s trying to kill you! But whatever.

And speaking of characters, my favorite has to be Sebastian. While we don’t really learn that much about him (despite the fact that he and his grandfather clearly have some kind of weird spy thing going on), his humorous comments pretty much made the book. And when he kissed Emmy in the locker room I had major Stydia vibes going on.

There was also one of Emmy’s best friends, Audrey. If we’re being honest here, she was just added to advance the plot. Her fallen relationship with Sebastian’s best friend isn’t really that much of an interest especially with everything else going on. I still love her and her nerdy self though!

And don’t get me started on Ben. He seemed somewhat likable at first. But then he got annoying. (Or just realistic? I dunno. I was too distracted with Sebastian. Oops! He’s the naggy annoying best friend (that she’s somehow in love with – ew) that you just want Emmy to drop and move into the arms of Sebastian. Wait, did I say that? I meant move on. Heh.  At least there’s Force, the bodyguard who is extremely scary but I’d also want to adopt me.

And of course, with so much that has to happen in too few pages, the book leaves on a cliffhanger like I’ve never seen before. Like, seriously. There’s so much left unanswered and it left me unsatisfied as I finished it. I NEED THE NEXT BOOK!! Oh well, I’ll just distract myself by re-reading series I’ve already reread a thousand times.

          

                                            My Rating: 3 Stars

                                    

                                         This book was really good, despite the frustrating factors.

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Addicted To Addicted To You

Hey there! Its been quite a while since I’ve posted. (Oops?) But in my defense, I’ve been reading. Like a lot. I’ve been reading the Addicted Series/Calloway Sisters Series by Krista and Becca Ritchie! I normally don’t like to post reviews unless I’ve finished a series, and since I recently finished the Addicted series itself (still working on Calloway series) I figured I’d blog something about the books that have quickly taken over my heart.

When I first heard of this series, recommended by a friend, I was a bit hesitant. The plot seemed a bit cheesy and it was definitely not rated PG. But those thoughts quickly went away as I read it. I could relate to Lily with her awkwardness (though not with her sex addiction – sorry Lily. Guess I’m a prude.)  And Loren? *swoon* But I’ve got to admit when Rose Calloway and Connor Cobalt were introduced a little (ok – a lot) of my attention was shifted. Academic rivals whose passion to beat each other quickly turns to passion for well… each other? Uh yes, please.  There’s also Ryke Meadows and Daisy Calloway whose connection gives me the feels. (Seriously. My eyes starting tearing up as I typed that sentence. I must be PMSing or something. Heh. Emotions? Idk her.)

The Addicted Series (and Calloway Sisters) also focuses on a lot of important issues. Sex Addiction, Alcoholism, PTSD, OCD, and others. I’ve got to admit when I first starting reading it the internalized misogynist part of myself immediately thought Lily Calloway as just a plain whore. But as the book got into more depth into her addiction I realized that wasn’t the cast. It also slyly addressed some of the sex issues every girl faces in the world about her sexuality.

So it’s like overall amazing.

Some of the plots are my personal favorites though. I’m not a fan of any reality TV Tropes but I’m usually plot driven while reading a book so that shows how interesting these books were written. (I can not stress enough how much I love this series.)

There’s just one small thing I don’t like though.

LET LOREN AND LILY BE HAPPY. Like, seriously. In every book, there have been major issues coming up for them and it’s like they’ve already been through the bad stuff stop making it worse. Honest to God, I’d read the books without any of the conflicts. Just 500ish pages of the Calloway crew being happy. Jeez, I’m sorry. I’m tearing up. *Again.* They just mean so much to me.

If you want to read the series, (which I highly recommend you should unless you prefer characters with fewer issues, and in that case, you should read it anyway), you can find the links to purchase them here or here.

I guess that’s all for now. (Don’t worry – I’ll most likely be writing about these characters again in the future. I don’t know how I could not.)

Tell me in the comments if you’ve read this or would like to!

Bye!

Thanks for Reading with me!
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REVIEW: Flannery

 

Synopsis: 

Sixteen-year-old Flannery Malone has it bad. She’s been in love with Tyrone O’Rourke since the days she still believed in Santa Claus. But Tyrone has grown from a dorky kid into an outlaw graffiti artist, the rebel-with-a-cause of Flannery’s dreams, literally too cool for school.

Which is a problem, since he and Flannery are partners for the entrepreneurship class that she needs to graduate. And Tyrone’s vanishing act may have darker causes than she realizes.

Tyrone isn’t Flannery’s only problem. Her mother, Miranda, can’t pay the heating bills, let alone buy Flannery’s biology book. Her little brother, Felix, is careening out of control. And her best-friend-since-forever, Amber, has fallen for a guy who is making her forget all about the things she’s always cared most about — Flannery included — leading Amber down a dark and dangerous path of her own.

When Flannery decides to make a love potion for her entrepreneurship project, rumors that it actually works go viral, and she suddenly has a hot commodity on her hands. But a series of shattering events makes her realize that real-life love is far more potent — and potentially damaging — than any fairy-tale prescription.

WARNING: THIS REVIEW MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS.

When I first started reading this book, I was a bit hesitant about it. I couldn’t relate to the main character, or any part of the storyline. But I pushed through. And it was worth it.

Most of the story is about Flannery’s social life. Her best friend Amanda, her school projects, and the famous Tyrone. And because of this, the theme of friendship is very present in the book. There is anger, hurt, jealousy, competition. Something that lots of teens deal with on a pretty much daily basis. At a first glance, romance seems like a major part of the book when in fact it is just a coming of age device in Flannery’s life. That was refreshing, when most of the time romance is presented in books as the most important thing in a teenager’s life.

But there is also a lot of stuff going on at home. It mostly centers around her mother. They’re broke. They don’t have a lot of money, and Flannery is frustrated by this. Especially when her mother buys her little brother toys but won’t give her the money to get a textbook for school. Flannery sees her mother as a selfish mess, but soon enough she learns that her mother is just like her – scared, confused, and trying her hardest.

While the book’s synopsis mentions potions one of the main parts of the book, it isn’t. Flannery making potions is merely what she is doing in school while she falls out with her friend, is frustrated with her crush, and deals with things at home. But it is a cool idea, especially when people start to think they work.

In the end, this book is a enjoyable coming of age contemporary book that I believe a lot of people would like.

                                             My Rating: 4.5 Stars

This book was really enjoyable, and I’m glad I finally knocked this one off my TBR list.

                                            Purchase this Book:

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Book Tour: Speed of Life Review

 Today I’m participating in a blog tour for Speed of Life organized by Smith Publicity! My first post of the year….. this should be fun!

 

 

Synopsis:

Sofia wonders if 14 might be the worst possible age to lose your mom. Talking with her dad about puberty and s-e-x is super-awkward (even though he is a gynecologist). And when she wants to talk about her mom, her friends don’t know what to say and her dad gets sad.

When Sofia discovers Dear Kate, an advice columnist from Fifteen magazine, she’s grateful to have someone to confide in about everything from crushes to mourning—someone who is completely, wonderfully anonymous. It feels ideal—until Sofia’s dad introduces her to his new girlfriend, Katherine Baird, a.k.a., Dear Kate…

WARNING: THIS REVIEW MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS.

This book was so cute. If I had to sum my feelings up in a short paragraph I would say that it was one of the best emotional relatable roller coasters that I’ve ever read.

First things first – Diversity. Its rare that you’d see a book of this age range with an actual diverse range of people. Normally it follows a middle class white set of characters, which can always get boring. But with this book, I was able to notice that the author actually put effort into having a diverse and unique set of characters. Characters like Lan, Kiki, Dr Pavlica, Mr Kapur, and Aisha were prime examples of this. Even though they weren’t main characters, this is quite the deal. This book was not only diverse in race but in sexuality as well, including everyone from the spectrum of the world.

The beginning of the book was beautiful. It gave warning to the reader that it was going to be sorrowful. And it was, but it had a tint of humor that lightened up the grief everyone was going through. The style of the book (January to January – each chapter in a month) was a very unique like the rest of the book and helped the reader understand that the emotions the characters were going through lasted a while. Unlike other books, where the format of the book made the emotions feel like they happened in such a short time.

Sofia’s character structure is very well written. She’s 14 and at the age where she needs her mom the most. She goes through so much while dealing with the grief of her dead mother. Sofia’s mother’s death left such a dent in her family and they all struggled in moving on. Her honesty, innocence, and naivety are all examples of her youth. She’s flexible and understanding and slowly adapts better to changes over time, a sign of her slowly growing up and becoming who she is.

Overall though, the plot of Speed of Life was not predictable or wild. I could understand where the book was going pretty early on. But it was an emotional, diverse, funny, cute coming of age story. It didn’t have one theme, which could make it relatable girls growing up. A cute read, and I loved it!

                           My Rating: 4.5 Stars

I recommend this book to  middle school age girls who are interested in contemporary books!

 

                                      Purchase this Book:

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REVIEW: The First Kiss Hypothesis

Title: The First Kiss Hypothesis

Author: Christina Mandelski

Page Count: 231

Originally Published: October 23, 2017

                                           

 

 

 

SYNOPSIS:

                            Nora Reid believes scientific laws control everything, even love. With her grandparents’ epic first kiss story cemented in her brain, Nora develops a hypothesis she’s determined to prove: for each person in the world, there is exactly one other person, and at first kiss, they’ll experience an immediate and intense reaction.

But after four years of zero-reaction kisses, she comes up with a new theory: maybe that pesky crush on her stunningly hot best friend Eli Costas is skewing her results.

She needs to get rid of him, and fast.

Eli Costas is an injury-prone lacrosse star with a problem—the one chance he had at winning over the girl next door resulted in the most epically sucktastic first kiss ever. And now she’s…trying to get rid of him? Hell no. It’s time to disprove her theory and show her exactly what she’s missing.

Game. On.

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